A happy first impression

A scene from near the beginning:

What am I doing, lazying around the girl’s dorms like this?

Protag: “Hiyo, where’s the male dorms!?”

Hiyo: “Male dorms?”

Protag: “I got the male and female dorms mixed up! I need to leave immediately!”

The fate of guys who stumble into female dorms is an unimaginably tragic ending. Ever since the time of Adam of Eve, the judgment for those who intrude into paradise is banishment.

I don’t want to be expelled on my first day at school!

Hiyo: “There isn’t a male dorm.”

Protag: “There isn’t? Why isn’t there one?”

Hiyo: “Because such a thing as a male dorm doesn’t exist within this school.”

Protag: “What? Then where do the guys live?”

Don’t tell me this is an all-girl’s school!

I followed my grandfather’s will and entered into the school as a girl, but this is supposed to only happen to those guys who look cuter than actual girls and can’t do anything BUT cross dress. How on earth did I land myself in this situation without realizing it!?

Hiyo: “You’re going to live here, danna-sama.”

Protag: “Oh crap, so I’m really one of those people with a cross-dressing fetish?”

This is awesome. Not to mention blissful therapy for my ears.

The odd thing is that I can’t quite tell which era this is from. I mean, there’s a washing machine and a wooden stove  in a house with a straw roof (how nostalgic, my great grandmother used a wooden stove). The guy wears really traditional clothing, but another girl wears a long shirt and leggings that go near the ankles, something that is pretty recent. In the bath, Hiyo is shown carrying plastic containers of shampoo and such, and there are hot water bottles and sneakers, so it’s all very odd…

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12 thoughts on “A happy first impression

    • Considerably more mysterious, and the comedy’s a little different, but the happy scenes carry a similar vibe (Hatutsuge’s M mode is absolutely hilarious). But the protagonist isn’t actually cross dressing, and it’s a different genre altogether, so it’s a bit hard to compare, I guess?

    • Having played both, Otoboku is more normal romance comedy, this one is more mystery/drama romance and less comedy. The chibis are by the same artist though.

      I think it’s modern day but they’re in a old prestigious school. But damn, the Chinese translation scene is very vast wow.

      The music is also very awesome in this game, but I think that might be my bias for oriental style music.

    • Generally, I check at Sumisora. I used to check at lost summer too, but sadly it died a while back… 2dgal has a pretty comprehensive list, and it’s a good place to start. Unlike sumisora, the 2dgal list doesn’t have links, but it’s pretty easy to do a search of the game, the translation group and 补丁 or 中文版. Jsharer’s incredibly useful in that respect.

      • I found it \o/
        But now I’m doubting my Chinese abilities ショボーン━━(´・ω・`)━━

      • It shouldn’t be that bad, at least it doesn’t have a lot of technical babble like Remember11 (guh, THAT was a nightmare). Anyway, you should try it even if you’re not feeling that confident, you never know, right?

        BTW, mind if I ask where you got your avatar image from?

      • Ah, it’s Tiv, no wonder it looked familiar.
        I think that should be a locale problem, but I’m not 100% sure. The game shouldn’t look like that until you’ve completed the entire though, did you use a save?

  1. I’m seriously wondering if that grandfather’s will quote and attending the school was spawned due to Otoboku (because the conditions/premise of that alone is essentially identical.

    There’s plenty of crossdressing-into-girl’s school/dorm scenarios, but the reasons all vary, with the easiest case being infiltration or no boys’ dorm (or something else), meaning I have less belief that it was spawned from somewhere else.

    And yes, certain visual novels enjoy mixing modern components with old fashioned items. Then again, some scenarios in games strictly emphasize countryside and city life differentials, so it’s not too odd. Granted, this game does show … a larger extreme.

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